ADVANCED NEW MEDIA SPRING/FALL 2018

2018 Spring Senior Show

Matt McQueeney

Matt McQueeney. Depth & Decay. HD Video 1920X1080. 2018

In his installation piece entitled Depth and Decay, Matt explored his interests in both contemporary art and traditional, old-world craftsmanship by combining film, glass, and metal work. He tied each medium together by the overarching theme of water. This piece is a reflection on lost histories and contemporary culture’s media influences. It consists of pre-recorded footage manipulated by analog synthesizers and projected immersively in the space. The centerpiece is a representation of a World War II era dive helmet, through the medium of glass and bronze.

Kelly Hamm

Kelly Hamm. Foresight. HD Video 1920X1080. 2018

Kelly Hamm. Coffee Break. HD Video 1920X1080. 2018

Kelly: "Psychology and creativity are deeply intertwined with one another, and that’s the core on how I created Foresight. It’s a self-observational piece that turned into a short 3D-animated film telling the story of an eyeball on its journey through various surrealist landscapes.

The viewer watches our protagonist, the green eye, on a journey of birth, childhood, and eventual adulthood. Although uncomfortable to watch, it is a journey that defines the core of who we are as people in part because of how we react to discovery and struggle. The viewer is left to wonder if the green eye will be able to project its warnings to our new character, the violet eye, and help it avoid the same fate.

In my piece, the viewer will quickly discover the variety of eyes, normal and disembodied, throughout the short. To me, these eyes are characters that become important to the viewer because they all represent parts of ourselves. Like the green eye, we will always be asking, “How can we discover the world around us? What are we trying to look for? What exactly are we trying to do with our lives?” Meanwhile the distorted eyes offer the opposite, yet equally important, perspective: “What could I have done differently? How can I utilize my knowledge? How can I teach others to take a better path?”

To me, the eyes are embodiments of phases we encounter throughout our lives. Regardless of whether those times are joyous or full of hardship, they’re all equally important. Although my medium requires computers and software, it’s still crucial for me to add those humanitarian questions within my pieces. The core of Foresight, and my identity as an artist, is to bring attention to questions that challenge our function and beliefs as individual human beings."

Andrew Patterson

Andrew about his piece Therianthropy: "A.I. (Artificial Intelligence) has the potential to become humanity’s greatest threat. Recent developments with A.I. technology have shown that computers are superior to their human counterparts at learning and problem-solving. In advanced games, A.I. can learn better techniques faster, repeating actions perfectly every time. A.I. can outperform any human attempting to beat them at any game. The misuse of A.I. is a serious problem that humans will need to address now, and not in the future. Currently, our electoral process is under attack by foreign governments trying to find the most effective way to manipulate public opinion. A.I. is already being used to form and maintain bot accounts to spread misinformation. There is a very real possibility that A.I. may take the place of humans in all jobs, including creative ones. This is a huge issue, because as it stands now, only those who own the technology will benefit from its work. As more jobs that we, as humans, never thought could be automated become automated, there is a risk that a very small percent of the population will receive all of the benefits. This technology is truly a double edged sword, as it could benefit us greatly, but also has the potential to be terrible for humanity. My project will focus on this tension.

My plan is to use similar A.I.’s that use the same “deep learning” to understand the world around them, and to visually show their understanding of the world based on what they were taught with. Using this A.I. I will show A.I.’s somewhat new ability to perceive reality and hopefully raise questions in the viewer’s mind about what this A.I. could accomplish in even a few years within creative fields, when it has already started dominating in fields of less creative labor without A.I..

My project will combine images of man and machine, showing a visual representation of a machines perception, and create a small narrative of growth from organic to inorganic, focusing on the important differences between man and machine, as well as the overlap. The purpose of this project is not to convince the viewer, but to get the viewer to develop a curiosity about these technologies."

2018 Fall Senior Show

John "Max" Balint

Max: "I believe being an artist is about the exploration of creative freedom and remaining open-minded to all possibilities. My work consists of abstract painting and digital work including; filmmaking, photography, and animation.

 

One of the most critical tasks in art is allowing myself to have a diverse range when creating. This range enables my process to become more optimistic and experimental. What I hope to accomplish in my work is the creation of an ultimate balance between variety and harmony.

 

For this body of work, I was interested in the idea of developing an appropriate juxtaposition between two different forms of art: painting and animation.  My work consists of an abstract animation and five paintings that explore the use of color and movement."

Augmented Reality Collaborative Project between the Salisbury University Physics and New Media Programs

Dr. Steven Binz of the Salisbury University Physics Department approached me about having New Media Art students create 3D digital models for a teaching tool he was creating in Augmented Reality.  

 

Augmented reality (AR) is an interactive experience of a real-world environment where the objects that reside in the real-world are "augmented" by computer-generated perceptual information, sometimes across multiple sensory modalities, including visualauditoryhapticsomatosensory, and olfactory.  The overlaid sensory information can be constructive (i.e. additive to the natural environment) or destructive (i.e. masking of the natural environment) and is seamlessly interwoven with the physical world such that it is perceived as an immersive aspect of the real environment.  In this way, augmented reality alters one's ongoing perception of a real world environment, whereas virtual reality completely replaces the user's real world environment with a simulated one.  

 

In this particular teaching tool that Dr. Binz was creating, he wanted his physics students to be able to visualize using a helmholtz coil to move charged particles around the room with augmented reality.  The Advanced New Media students created the models for Dr. Binz and he plugged them into his augmented software, called Unity (which is also a video game creation engine).  

 

Dr. Binz presented his research with our models on 7/30/2018 at the 2018 Summer National Conference for the American Association of Physics Teachers (AAPT) in DC.

 

This is the information on his demonstration: 

CE04: 7/30/2018, 6:30-6:40 p.m. Collaborative Exploration of Introductory E&M via Augmented Reality

Contributed – Steven Binz, Salisbury University, 1101 Camden Ave., Salisbury, MD 21801; smbinz@salisbury.edu

"Augmented reality places computer-generated content into the field of view of the user and until recently, this meant the content was added to a video feed that would then be displayed on a computer. Now there are general-purpose headsets that can be worn that make it look like the graphics are in the room with the user, who
can then walk around and interact with them in an intuitive way. I am using this technology to help students learn about electric and magnetic fields by developing a program that allows students to collaboratively create and move simulated charges so they can see the interaction between the fields and the charges. The goal is for student comprehension to improve when they can interact with each other while using the simulation and can see the fields and forces in all three dimensions."

Music Video Project with Advanced New Media Students and Western Massachusetts Rock Band Carinae

Carinae's Femme. HD Video 1920X1080. Advanced New Media 2018

As part of the Seeing Sound Series at Salisbury University, New Media students work with musicians to create visuals for projections.  This time we took it a step further and the Advanced New Media Students created a music video for the band, too.  The band is Carinae and they are a psychedelic rock and roll band based in Western Massachusetts.  We used a variety of cameras/equipment for this project, including a video drone, the Black Magic, the C100 on a Ronin stabilizer, and a Canon 5D.  We also did a lot of post production work and animation with this project.

PROJECT ONE: THE SURREAL LANDSCAPE

To introduce advanced students to Cinema 4D, I have them create a fully navigable “Surrealist” Landscape in the program.  I have them navigate through this landscape by creating and using a virtual moving camera.  They should try to think of the camera as mounted on a helicopter or drone, flying through their Cinema 4D Landscape.  For inspiration, we looked at Surrealism in particular, but not exclusively.  We also watched excerpts from Werner Herzog’s Lessons of Darkness, which is a film about the aftermath of the First Gulf War, when Saddam Hussein destroyed the oil fields of Kuwait and retreated back to Iraq.  Much of the footage is shot from a helicopter. There is a voice-over track, (reading from the Book of Revelations) and a music soundtrack: Wagner's Twilight of the Gods.  This film is a good place to start for their inspiration.  I see their landscape film having a similar feel to it:  a restless, moving camera, able to fly in any direction at will.  The camera could pass through apocalyptic landscapes as well as utopias and untouched natural splendor.  They can use music or include a voice over track if they get so inspired with words.   Another good place for the students to look for inspiration is Surrealism:  Dali, Tanguy, Kay Sage, Max Ernst, Dorthea Tanning, Renee Magritte, etc.  The final animation is required to be between 4 and 7 minutes long.   

Student Examples:

Justin W. The Tale of the Tree. HD Video 1920X1080. 2018

Chris M. Yellowish Sub. HD Video 1920X1080. 2018

Jordan D. The World On The Other Side. HD Video 1920X1080. 2018

Robert M. Broken Lamp. HD Video 1920X1080. 2018

PROJECT TWO: THE 3D Print

I asked students to create 3 different sculptures using the 3D print lab at the Academic Commons.    Students will:

 

  1. create a sculpture using both the 3D pen and a 3D modeled base.  In Cinema 4D, students will create the model, which will be a base or pedestal for the sculpture that will be created with a 3D pen.  This base can be a traditional pedestal or it can be stylized.  Once the base is created in C4D, it will be printed at the 3D lab.  Once your print is complete, the student will make an appointment to use the 3D pen in the Print Lab.  The student will use the base/pedestal to draw your 3D pen sculpture upon.  Completed sculpture (including base) should be no more than 8 inches tall. 

  2. create a sculpture from a 3D model.  Students will create the model in Cinema 4D.  They should create a pedestal/base for the sculpture.  The base can be separate or it can be one piece.  The sculpture (including the base) should be no more than 8 inches tall.  Students should use virtual sculpting tools and previous design skills to be able to create this sculpture. 

  3. create a relief sculpture using both a 3D scan and a 3D model.  This sculpture should be able to hang on the wall, so make sure to include a hole in the back for a nail.  Students should scan a part of your body: face/hands/feet/etc.  Then merge the scanned body part on a flat surface in Cinema 4D.  This flat surface should be able to hang on the wall.  This sculpture should be able to be printed in one piece.

 

There was also a research component to this project. 

 

A) First, students will find one image from three different artists from this list of artists that might inspire them for this project:

 

  1. David Smith

  2. Lee Bontecou

  3. Katarzyna Kobro

  4. Antoine Pevsner

  5. Alexander Calder

  6. Joan Miró

  7. Ruth Asawa

  8. Henry Moore

  9. Constantin Brancusi

  10. Naum Gabo

  11. Lynda Benglis

  12. Eva Hesse

  13. Barbara Hepworth

  14. Martin Puryear

  15. Richard Serra

  16. Anish Kapoor

  17. Antony Gormley

  18. Michael Enn Sirvet

 

B) Second, students will look at images from our 3D professors here at SU, including Steven Durow, Bill Wolff, John Rees, David Smith, and Catherine Hellston.  Students will look at images on their websites and choose two different images that might inspire them for this project.

 

C) Third, students will research deconstructivist and modernist architecture, particularly the works of these architects listed below.  Students will choose two different images that might inspire them for this project:

 

  1. Frank Gehry

  2. Zaha Hadid

3)    Friedensreich Hundertwasser

4)    Antonio Gaudi

5)    Le Corbusier

6)    Buckminster Fuller

7)    Vito Acconci

8)    Eero Saarinen 

  1. Coop Himmelblau

  2. Vladimir Tatlin

  3. Vladimir Shukhov

  4. Rem Koolhaus

  5. Eric Owen Moss

  6. Baikdoosan Architects & Engineers

 

D) Next, students will research contemporary artists who are making sculptures with 3D printers.  Students will present the work of one artist and show at least two different images of their work.

 

E) Finally, students will assemble these images into a slideshow and give a short presentation on the works that they have researched.  There should be a title page and there should be exactly nine slides with images.  There should also bet the title of the work, the year, and the artist’s name to accompany each image.  Students will speak about each artist very briefly during their presentation. 

 

Students will use knowledge of the foundations of art and design to create 3 simple, yet effective, 3D printed sculptures. Students were graded on originality of design and the balance of sculpture (literal and formal).   These 3D Sculptures were displayed in the glass cases in Fulton in Fall 2017.